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Posts Tagged ‘Social Justice’

 World Heutagogy Day 2019 #wHday19

Every year on 26th September we celebrate the publication of the first book on Heutagogy in 2013 called Self-Determined Learning, for that is what it is. Edited by the (fathers) of Heutagogy Stewart Hase and Chris Kenyon it featured a range of contributions about how we might define, describe and so enable self-determined learning. That was just a start, as we now run World Heutagogy Day every year.

In response to Greta Thunberg’s call for a climate strike we are looking this year at How Can We Green Our Learning?  World I’ve been running workshops at New Cross Learning to both turn that into a Green Library with resources to help #GreenMyLearning, and to do some thinking about what I have learnt in 40 years of trying to Green My Own Learning. Ive done a lot starting with discovery the (father) of Green Anarchism Kropotkin and his alt.Darwin view of Mutual Aid. Curiously, like David Bowie they both lived in Bromley…  I’ve been a Governor of a Green Research organisation, CoPIRG, done 2 Masters theses on the Environmental Impact of Computing, I’ve Greened My Teaching, Greened my Institution, set up a Green Education Centre, set up a Green Transition Town,  created Green Money and abandoned my car for walking and public transport in 2008. This is how I’ve worked on making my own learning as green as I’m allowed to…

World Heutagogy Day, held annually every 26th September, we update both our thinking and our practice on Heutagogy with a discussion around a topic, which we collate into a Curated Conversation. The Curated Conversation is a kind of “wisdom of crowds” approach which allows shared themes to emerge and present a diverse, but collaborative, view of our thinking. We do this by collecting individual contributions of 50 words each answering the same question. So How Do Green Our Learning in 50 words? Contributions as follows;

How Do We Green Our Learning

Theme1 Ecosystems

Fred Garnett; “To Green our learning we must learn to learn from nature and not just receive instruction from texts
Nature talks to us in waves and particles. If we ride the waves together we can transcend our particular limitations. We are nature and it is our shared ecosystem of resources”

Nigel Ecclesfield “Knowing the living world requires me to understand that I am a body/ecology with five times as many live, bacterial cells as there are cells from my own DNA and that I need to understand this and many other interpenetrations of being we call ecologies. I also need to learn how to contribute to nurturing the meta-ecology we call Earth.

Stewart Hase ‘To Green our Learning, we need to enable learners: to use their natural, innate ability to learn rather than interfere with a perfect system by teaching; and to find their natural talents and maximise them. Learning is a natural ecosystem that we should enhance rather than interfere with

Theme 2 Planet & Lifestyles

Vijaya Bhanu Kote; “To Green our learning, we must green our life styles. To Green our learning, we must implement the 3R’s formula in every walk of life. Teach the kids the same. Life style change towards Greening shall lead us to pollution free planet. Sustainability must be a deed rather than a word.

Lemke Kamps ACTION! Protecting our Earth is important. Positive education and awareness are the key. Green activities will give us the mindset to realize our planet’s value. When we all work together, we can minimize the damage we cause to our rare planet and set the course for a brighter, greener future

Bridget McKenzieFor the planet to sustain life so that we can live in abundance, we need to learn together and fast. Our cultural values need to shift towards an ecological way of knowing. We say the devil is in the detail, but we forget it’s also in the patterns

Theme3 Movement & Natural Curiosity

Paul Chapman We can green our learning by going out into nature rather than just sitting and looking at photos of Ladywell Fields. I learnt more by putting on waders and walking in Deptford Creek than from 100 conferences. You need to see and smell the natural world to learn from it

Kate Faragher We Green our Learning by moving our bodies.  When we walk and talk, we learn and listen in a different way. When we move, dance or exercise after study or work, we embed the learning into our bodies.  When we exercise we engage our mind differently and can innovate.

Tony Wheeler “Be curious, confident and question authority (what’s in it for them?).
Be a generalist, look for connections.
Never specialise in someone else’s facts and tests.
Open your heart and find people to help you understand, value and change things.
Have fun and tell better stories than growth fixated consumer fetishists.”

Ian Woolley “I green my learning by asking questions about the things that I use. What is it made of? Where did it come from? Why does it look like that? Who made it? Can I take it apart? Can I adapt it? Can I fix it? Do I need it?

Theme 4 Context and Place

Jean-Marc Gancille; We want to invent ecological transitions at our place of work. We must question the consequences of our acts on a daily basis and learn to reuse and recycle our resources. Our ambitions come up against environmental limits; we need a sense of moderation and sobriety in our practices.

Fernando Mendes / Ana Dias; We need to rethink our Third Places, make them very organic and free yet based on multi-disciplinary co-working; the ideas of collaboration on projects and space sharing. We need spaces that are welcoming and open where everyone can create new ideas and projects that can co-exist, collaborate and contribute organically.

Razvan Necula “They put a fence in the middle of our park. Around the spot where the Mayor wanted to build an official group. That evening it was covered with children’s drawings demanding a free lawn. The group was eventually established outside Parcul Circului This is our example of practical green learning

Buinho Being an inspiring place, fostering creativity, collaboration and innovation in a FabLab. A place where we eat, sleep, enjoy unique rural nature and make cool stuff. A work in progress; with our residents we are always improving the spaces and adapting them based on the overall vision and current needs

Theme 5 Science and Technology

Martin Owen: Gather evidence. Test your assumptions. Learn to model. Use the many tools available. Learn variables that do good, learn to amplify them. Learn variables that do bad, learn to attenuate them. Learn that, although crying is useful and necessary, pain is relieved by “making” things better. Wax on, wax off

Nick Jeans; “Travel by car and plane is a major source of pollution. With more trust and better use of technology we can allow many more people to work from home.   Lessons and lectures can also be delivered online, reducing travel by students and staff.

Fred Garnett; “Technology is order imposed on nature. We need to return to natural philosophy which respects diverse opinions not pronouncements of great men. Nature is built with fractals and exists in a quantum universe, but we are oppressed by mechanical institutions and linear thinking. Let’s become learning alchemists co-creating education”

 

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From Education to Learning; A Brief History of Open (2)

Last Week I asked; what have we learnt from Web-enabled Education? Has the Web begun to enable more learning-centred approaches? Have we used the affordances of new technology to improve our learning, lives and society? This was in answer to @aleksk on Untangling the Web observation who said she would focus on ‘pedagogical theories, online education enablers, novel learning techniques and approaches that the web affords’. In fact her brief article in todays Observer disappointingly focusses on university research issues, a customary mistake by academics and policy-makers. Shockingly she quotes the complacent Hamish MacLeod (who he?) at Edinburgh “I wouldn’t say there are any profound changes in the way we should be thinking about theories of learning”. I beg to differ! So let’s look a little more inclusively at what the web has afforded us for learning.

What have we learnt from Web-enabled Education; in terms of pedagogical theories, online education enablers, novel learning techniques and approaches as Aleks Krotoski asked? Well last week as I argued that in untangling the web on education’ we are only taking a fifteen-year snapshot of a 50-year process of social change. Picking out the educational consequences of the web is a small and partial view of a broader ongoing set of social processes. Primarily we can say that the web has resulted more in changes to the processes of learning than in changes to the nature of the institutions of education; the consequences of the web on those institutions are yet to be fully realised.

However in terms of pedagogy there can’t have been a richer 15-year period since (more…)

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(1) From Education to Learning; A Brief History of Open

If we try to untangle the impact of the web on education we can describe it as enabling a shift from a focus on education as a system to learning as a process, particularly since the web itself has become more open, social and participatory, especially since Web 2.0.  So how did we get here?

Background; I myself (@fredgarnett) started looking at the impact of the Web, indirectly, in 1984 when I began teaching a Unit called Information, Technology and Society. Deciding that taking the tropes of the Industrial Revolution and applying them to the Information Revolution was way too limited I looked instead at how the social organisation of settlements emerged out of agriculture and that from hunter-gathering; maps, flints and fires. Inspired by Yoneji Masuda and Nikolai Kondratieff, and my own observations, by 1988 I had evolved the NSU model, so-called because I think social change comes from new Networks being built, new Services being provided and new User behaviours emerging, over 50-year long-wave Kondratieff economic cycles stimulated by new technologies; the micro-chip was invented in 1971. New economies emerge from new networks of distribution. In 1989 I wrote a story to capture the changes we might see by 2021 as a Masters paper called Homi & the NeXT One (the title a tribute to Steve Jobs). Consequently I have had some understanding of the process by which new technology changes society ever since. For me the key aspect discernible over the last 250 years (especially when preceded by a knowledge revolution like the scientific revolution) are the cumulative effects of unnoticed second-order, or unanticipated, effects; hence the poverty of most predictions about the future which focus on first-order (anticipated effects) based on the knowledge of experts whose expertise is historically based.

Watching the Web Flow 1990s; Being more Utopian than dystopian I looked forward to the, then, forthcoming information revolution democratising our representative democracy, with its UK roots in the 17th Century (1689), by enabling new participatory *constitutions* to be written, redefining the social relations by which we live. Whether they be communications, networked or mash-ups, technologies don’t change society, they create first-order effects, that is consequences of what the technologies were designed to do. Social change comes from users inventing new use-states in line with their beliefs and social behaviours. (more…)

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#purposedpsi Sheffield April 30th

This is a post expanding on my talk at the Purpos/ed Event for a wonderful bunch of  educational ‘Instigators’ at Sheffield. The slides are on slideshare and I will expand on those points and include some of the discussions from the day here. Doug Belshaw had asked me to keep it simple and to look at Keri Facer’s new book on Learning Futures. Keri looks at a number of issues relating to how schools might be organised in 2035 but the point that appealed to me most was the one of ‘slow citizenship‘ as it tied in with my Purpos/ed post discussing the Scottish notion of the Democratic Intellect and our  complete (English) inability to make the link between the life we want and the responsibilities of citizenship.

Keri’s vision of slow citizenship, or taking time to build the future you want, requires ‘sustained commitment to the lived communities, local neighbourhoods & social relationships through which we live(more…)

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CAL11 Workshop 1pm  April 15th  #mosialong

This workshop was exploring how to design ambient learning environments using the Emergent Learning Model. Slides for this session were updated from the Ambient Learning City talk March 2011.

If this is too abstract then we can reference the works of Howard Rheingold, Dave Weinberger and Clay Shirkey and describe the Emergent Learning Model as; Smart Mobs + Everything is Miscellaneous means Here Comes Everybody

We are also thinking of how we might use Innovation as an ‘Open Platform’ (Steven Johnson) to allow ‘generative innovations‘ to further transform learning.  (more…)

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#CAL11 & #11rsj

There is a debate going on in the conference on what CAL Researchers can do to enable social justice. Here are 11 ideas for a start, there are many more;

1. Set up a Public Interest Research Group and undertake research that benefits your community eg CoPIRG; Train your researchers to be socially responsible

2. Volunteer. Work in a community centre and enable socially inclusive learning to happen; learn from the socially excluded  (more…)

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